Cristo Redentor

Cristo Redentor

The huge Art Deco statue of Christ, known as Cristo Redentor (Christ the Redeemer), gazes out over Rio de Janeiro and the bay from the summit of Corcovado with arms outstretched 28 metres, as if to include all of humanity.

It rises at a height of 709 metres in Tijuca National Park, and a 3.5-kilometer rack train climbs to the top, where a large plaza surrounds the statue. The 30-meter statue, built of reinforced concrete and soapstone, was completed in 1931 by Polish-French sculptor Paul Landowski and Brazilian engineer Heitor da Silva Costa.

 

The chapel, which is popular for weddings, is enclosed within the eight-meter base. Although it is one of Brazil’s most well-known symbols, it is frequently wrongly referred to as The Christ of the Andes, as opposed to the earlier monument that marks the border between Argentina and Chile.

 

Trails through Tijuca National Park, a massive forest that protects springs, waterfalls, and a great variety of tropical birds, butterflies, and flora, are accessible from the railway’s mid-point station. Within the park, there are several other perspectives.